2014 Year In Review

By | December 17th, 2014

blog-2014

Seven years ago we started on a mission to make storing data astonishingly easy and low-cost so that no one loses their wedding photos, curated music, work files, or any of the other items from their computers. In 2014, I’m proud to say we made a good dent in that mission. Here are a few of the highlights from our 2014 year in review.

Products
We launched an Android app to complement our existing iPhone app and increased restore sizes on hard drives to 4 TB and by 2x on flash drives to 128 GB so our customers could access more of their data faster. Email Notifications and Backup Summaries ensured they knew their data was safely backed up. Our refer-a-friend program gave our customers and their friends months of Backblaze for free. Upgrades to support iOS 8, Apple OS X Yosemite, and hundreds of smaller updates to keep improving the service for our customers.

Community
I am incredibly grateful to the community that has supported us over the years. Another 11 incredible people joined our team to help us scale, plus a few interns (one of whom just won a $100,000 national science award.)

On Twitter, Facebook, and other digital places we talked with you virtually and then met many of you in person at Macworld, RootsTech, and many other events.

We wrote 75 blog posts such as those sharing a bunch of data on hard drive reliability, the impact of temperature on a hard drive, and which hard drive SMART stats matter. Since about 1,000,000 of you read these posts, we revamped our blog platform and will strive to continue sharing learning worthy of your time reading.

Scale
The simplicity of the product our customers see hides the wild scale of the systems and operations required to support it. We introduced a new 270 TB Storage Pod this year, scaled up to store over 100,000,000 GB of customer data, and opened a huge new 500 petabyte data center. Our support team answered their 100,000th ticket. Our customers recovered over 6 billion files that would have been irretrievably lost.

Recognition
Famed consumer product reviewer Walt Mossberg recommends Backblaze and makes it his personal service. Gizmag calls Backblaze one of the easiest to use. And Deloitte ranks Backblaze the 128th fastest growing company in North America, with 917% revenue growth over five years.

Next
So with 2015 imminently arriving, where do we go? Keep focusing on making storing data astonishingly easy and low-cost. One of the things I’m incredibly proud of our team for is being able to support a 1000% increase in per-customer data storage while keeping the $5 unlimited pricepoint unchanged. Thus, a lot of what we have planned will continue to be in the background – enhancing our massive cloud storage system to scale bigger, be more cost-efficient, and work ever better – so that our customers can continue to store more and more data, easier and easier.

A huge thank you to all of you: our customers, our community, our partners, and our employees for helping us make this happen.

 

Gleb Budman
Co-founder and CEO of Backblaze. Founded three prior companies. He has been a speaker at GigaOm Structure, Ignite: Lean Startup, FailCon, CloudCon; profiled by Inc. and Forbes; a mentor for Teens in Tech; and holds 5 patents on security.

Follow Gleb on: Twitter / LinkedIn / Google+
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Category:  Backblaze Bits
  • mml

    why not make an app for windows phone too.

  • Very cool Gleb. Happy to be a Backblaze customer.

  • Led

    I love your product. You keep rocking it, I’ll keep re-subscribing every year :)

  • Joshua Kugler

    I’ve turned a few people on Backblaze, and they love it. Sadly, I still can’t use it, as there is no Linux client. Any ETA on that?

    • rossng

      Same issue here. I’m stuck using CrashPlan, which is not even half as good as Backblaze.

  • Jayna Sheats

    I appreciate very much your “reasonable” cost model, which is more in the spirit of iTunes than some of the exorbitant monthly fees that many service providers require. I also like the interface; unlike the more traditional “backup”, one can just retrieve the files one wants. If the entire disk crashes, of course one wants everything. But recently my computer failed (not the hard disk) and I had to use a spare while the logic board was fixed. Being able to just download essential files for the week (a mere 20 GB…) was wonderful.