Backblaze and Dropbox: Complementary Cloud Services

May 25th, 2016

Dropbox and Backblaze

We’ve talked before about the difference between online storage and online backup. One of the most popular online sharing services is Dropbox. Many of us have both Dropbox and Backblaze installed side by side on the same computer. How do they work together to keep your computer data protected? Let’s take a look.

What is Dropbox?

Dropbox is a subscription-based file sharing service. People use it to share files with each other, and sync files between different computers. Some even use it to back up files, but are often surprised by how much that can cost and how much work is involved to truly back up all their data.

You can share all sorts of files with Dropbox, and you can manage your account using a web browser or a smartphone app. You can allow other users access to specific files and folders, which makes Dropbox a handy tool for projects and an easy way to share things like photos, videos and other media-rich content with friends and colleagues.

Dropbox’s basic account is free, though you’re limited to only 2GB of storage space. Subscribing to the company’s Pro service costs $9.99 per month for 1 terabyte (TB) of storage. When your Dropbox account exceeds its storage limit it stops syncing and storing additional data.

How Dropbox Works

Dropbox is essential software for millions of users. The Dropbox app and service make it seamless to share files between computers and between users, making Dropbox a popular option for home users and businesses alike.

Dropbox duplicates a folder on your own hard drive in the cloud. Changes you make to your local Dropbox folder are made to the cloud as well. You can recover deleted files up to 30 days from the time they’re removed, using the Dropbox interface.

Dropbox’s business offerings make it suitable for managing documents with version control, with sophisticated group access and remote security features.

Dropbox has proven to be a versatile and popular way to help people share files with each other. Thousands of other apps and services have popped up that hook into Dropbox in different ways. For many of us, Dropbox is an essential application for our business and personal computing use.

Dropbox and Backblaze

Dropbox is a great tool for syncing and sharing and will keep a backup of your Dropbox folder. However in order to ensure all of your data files are backed up you’ll want to complement Dropbox with an unlimited cloud backup service like Backblaze. There several places where Backblaze complements Dropbox.

  • Dropbox backs up the files in the Dropbox folder but it doesn’t backup any files that are outside of the Dropbox folder. You can have your “Documents” or “My Documents” folder be a Dropbox folder but often sharing becomes complicated as you attempt to segment private from public files. Even with this set-up, users will often find there are important files not in their Dropbox folder. For example, email, photos, videos, music and more are often saved by default elsewhere. Backblaze backs up all the data you create regardless of where it is located on your computer.
  • Your Dropbox folder contains the files you put there, either by drag-and-drop or saving. Backblaze automatically backs up your files regardless of where they are located. No dragging and dropping required to back them up.
  • Backblaze is unlimited, so it won’t stop working when you reach your account limit. There is no limit. So for just $5/month your data is backed up – no fuss.
  • Better yet, Backblaze will even back up your Dropbox folder, even if it is located on your desktop, making sure your data is safe.

Dropbox lets you share and sync files with ease. Backblaze backs up all of your computer’s essential data to the cloud – that includes the contents of your computer’s Dropbox folder. Together they provide you with the flexibility to share your data as desired and the piece of mind in knowing it is automatically and safely backed up.

Peter Cohen
Peter will never give you up, never let you down, never run around or desert you. He also manages the Backblaze blog.

Follow Peter on:
His web site: peter-cohen.com | Twitter: @flargh | LinkedIn: Peter Cohen | Google+: Peter Cohen
  • Adrian Sevcenco

    It would be worth to add that dropbox has a linux client, backblaze does not … so, in this respect, dropbox has a better backup service than backblaze ;)

    • Well, it certainly has a better syncing and sharing service for Linux customers than Backblaze! Though, we do have Backblaze B2 that you can use in conjunction with one of our integrators -> https://www.backblaze.com/b2/docs/integrations.html. Check it out ;-)

      • Adrian Sevcenco

        Thanks a lot for info!!! I was not aware of these options! Many thanks!

      • trey

        I completely agree with Adrian. Also, Backblaze B2 is not a backup solution, it’s an aws s3 alternative. Please state plainly that you do not support linux users. More important is if you have plans to at all in the future.